Why Directional Mics are Inherently Colored

There are a substantial number of microphones with an essentially flat on-axis frequency response (to within about one or two dB), but without exception these mics are omnidirectional. Typically these mics are designed for making acoustical measurements, not music recordings, but can work well for both applications. Notable brands that sell these types of mics…

Dark Side of the Mic - Why Axis Matters

All microphones have a frequency response that is dependent on the direction that sound arrives from. Audio engineers have made use of this fact to adjust the tonality of recordings probably for as long as microphones have existed. For some mics, particularly cardioid condensers, about 20 degrees off-axis gives the flattest smoothest response. Moving farther…
Sphere U47 Vocal Shootout Setup

Sphere Audio Comparisons with Vintage Mics

How does Sphere compare to the classic microphones we modeled? That’s perhaps the question most asked and which, of course, deserves an answer. Central to the development of Sphere were countless listening tests and comparisons, with the various vintage mics that we modeled. Over the last few weeks, in particular, we hosted several listening sessions…
townsend-labs-l22-with-3d-sphere

Sphere™ Technology Whitepaper

Over the years there have been a handful of products designed to model microphones. Typically these products took a conventional studio microphone, such as a Shure SM57, as a source and applied processing to make it sound like some other microphone, such as a Neumann U47. Some microphone modeling products have used a custom designed microphone…

Why Directional Mics are Inherently Colored

There are a substantial number of microphones with an essentially flat on-axis frequency response (to within about one or two dB), but without exception these mics are omnidirectional. Typically these mics are designed for making acoustical measurements, not music recordings, but can work well for both applications. Notable brands that sell these types of mics…

Dark Side of the Mic - Why Axis Matters

All microphones have a frequency response that is dependent on the direction that sound arrives from. Audio engineers have made use of this fact to adjust the tonality of recordings probably for as long as microphones have existed. For some mics, particularly cardioid condensers, about 20 degrees off-axis gives the flattest smoothest response. Moving farther…
Sphere U47 Vocal Shootout Setup

Sphere Audio Comparisons with Vintage Mics

How does Sphere compare to the classic microphones we modeled? That’s perhaps the question most asked and which, of course, deserves an answer. Central to the development of Sphere were countless listening tests and comparisons, with the various vintage mics that we modeled. Over the last few weeks, in particular, we hosted several listening sessions…
townsend-labs-l22-with-3d-sphere

Sphere™ Technology Whitepaper

Over the years there have been a handful of products designed to model microphones. Typically these products took a conventional studio microphone, such as a Shure SM57, as a source and applied processing to make it sound like some other microphone, such as a Neumann U47. Some microphone modeling products have used a custom designed microphone…